Must-Sees

Ganjnameh

Ganjnameh, meaning the book of treasure, an important highlight of Hamadan, located 5km southwest of the city, includes two historically important inscriptions dating back to the 5th century BCE carved into a rock at the foot of Mt. Alvand, written upon the order of Darius, the Great, and his son, Xeroxes, in three dead languages of Old Persian, Neo-Babylonian, and Neo-Elamite.

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Alavian Tomb Tower

The most significant architectural heritage of Hamadan dating back to Seljuk period, a rectangular brick structure, the building is not domed anymore as the dome has collapsed; however, it is still called Qonbad-e Alavian (Alavian Dome). The building is mainly a single chamber with beautiful stuccowork and plaster.

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Tomb of Esther and Mordecai

The most sacred site for the Iranian Jewish, recounted in the biblical book of Esther, the tomb is said to be for Esther, the cousin of Mordecai, the Jewish counsel to Xeroxes, who was chosen as the Xeroxes’ queen. According to the book, she, cleverly, tried her best to neutralize the machinations of Haman, a Persian Noble, who was determined to slay all Jewish population in Persia.

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Tomb of Avicenna

The icon of Hamadan, tomb of Avicenna, the well-known Iranian physician and philosopher of 11th century whose book, Canon of Medicine, is world-famous, was built in 1954 including both Pre-Islamic and Islamic designs and styles with a domed structure standing upon 12 pillars each of which representing one of the disciplines with which Avicenna is also recognized.

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Ecbatana

The most important archeological site in Hamadan, located in the center of the city, the ruins of Ecbatana belong to one of the most magnificent cities of the ancient world the foundation of which, as Herodotus, the famous Greek historian asserts, is attributed to Deioces. The city was originally built within 7 walls protecting different parts of the city with each wall enjoying a certain color and the two most inner walls encircled the nobilities’ residences.

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Tomb of Baba Taher

An 11thcentury dervish and poet from Hamadan, Baba Taher is best known for his do-baytis, i.e. quatrains composed not in the standard roba’i meter but in a simpler meter, still widely used for popular verse.This interesting tomb is an appeal in the city.

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Suggested Tours

Iran’s Capitals

Iran’s Capitals

Capitals in a Row

Heritage Trail

Heritage Trail

Iran's UNESCO Prides